Battle of Pleasant Hill {Shreveport/Bossier Photographer}

April 20, 2013  •  Leave a Comment

 

Finally. The kids and I have been wanting to take in a Civil War reenactment for a couple months now. Several different events have popped up and into my sites around the internet and through my contacts, but our schedules wouldn't budge. Since we've never before lived in the Deep South (with the exception of Virginia, which isn't really the DEEP South, and yes, there is a difference), Civil War historical 'anythings' are new for my kids.  Even growing up in Texas, our local history lessons mostly involved the Alamo.  When we lived in Virginia, we visited mostly all of the battle sites around us, including Geddysburg and Fredricksberg.   But, since such trips happened 8-10 years ago, my chitlins have little recollection of such valuable education. Ha!  Truth be told, I really just wanted to photograph such a cool event.  (I can kill two birds right?) 

Honestly, the hour-long drive deep into the heart of Louisiana was causing my expectations to plummet.  Although the scenery was beautiful, we happened upon few human faces to reassure me that we were, in fact, anywhere close to the battle site destination. Yep, the middle of nowhere. Finally, the rural highway opened up, out of the blue, to hundreds of people gathered along the road. Wow! We found it and once we got in a settled, we found probably just as many 'actors' participating as spectators there just to watch.   According to the event emcee, this particular reenactment is one of the only events to actually happen on the historic site itself. The 'actors' were truly authentic, with nothing that wasn't 'period' on their persons.  We were carried back in time.

Just as we approached the line of cannons and their keepers, to take a closer look, a distinguished gentleman eyed us and asked if perhaps one of my offspring "would possibly be interested in serving as a 'powder monkey' for the day?"

The boy's eyes danced.

Apparently, a powder monkey, during civil war battles, transported the cannon shot between the stockpile of ammo and the actual cannon, thereby keeping the means of firing, and the stockpile, far separate.  Arriving in jeans and a t-shirt, this boy did not look 'period accurate', so out of the blue, a wool jacket (albeit a little small for his 6'3" frame) and hat magically found their way to him.

 

We actually jumped out of our seats as the rumbles of the first cannon shots reverberated across the hills to signal the beginning. It was sooooo LOUD!

We watched the battle unfold and found ourselves carried away to a sunny (and bloody) April day in 1864.

All in all, the boy had a grand time firing cannons and we spent a fabulous educational afternoon in the sun!

These are just a few images I chose, but have a look at all of them here .


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...

Archive
January February (1) March (1) April (1) May June July August September October November December
January (1) February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December